Last edited by Kijind
Monday, February 3, 2020 | History

5 edition of Oversold and underused found in the catalog.

Oversold and underused

computers in the classroom

by Larry Cuban

  • 350 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Computerunterstützter Unterricht,
  • Technologie éducative,
  • Évaluation,
  • Nouvelles technologies de l"information,
  • Histoire,
  • Onderwijstechnologie,
  • Computergestuurd onderwijs,
  • Computer-assisted instruction,
  • Enseignement assisté par ordinateur,
  • Educational technology,
  • Evaluation,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 202-242) and index.

    StatementLarry Cuban
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsLB1028.5 .C77 2001
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Pagination250 p. ;
    Number of Pages250
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24972969M
    ISBN 10067400602X
    ISBN 109780674006027
    LC Control Number2001020420
    OCLC/WorldCa45917151

    In addition, early adopters of gamification techniques in the classroom tended to be computer science instructors, implying that a degree of familiarity with the gaming environment is needed before seeing significant trends in the use of gamification in instruction. Table of Contents Impelled by a demand for increasing American strength in the new global economy, many educators, public officials, business leaders, and parents argue that school computers and Internet access will improve academic learning and prepare students for an information-based workplace. In "Oversold and Underused", Larry Cuban argues that when teachers are not given a say in how the technology might reshape schools, computers are merely souped-up typewriters and classrooms continue to run much as they did a generation ago. Real estate agents and parents cite the number of computers in their local schools to demonstrate the quality of their children's education.

    Cuban thinks that without changing our social structures, work environments, and By examining use of computers in Silicon Valley area schools, arguably one of the most technically advanced education settings, Cuban shows us how merely providing computers in every classroom fails to accomplish much sought after teaching reform. Cuban insists that educators must ask: " Question 5. In Oversold and Underused, one of the most respected voices in American education argues that when teachers are not given a say in how the technology might reshape schools, computers are merely souped-up typewriters and classrooms continue to run much as they did a generation ago. While the first two, according to the article, have been pretty-well documented to improve academic performance, it is the third--the use of computers in such a way that transforms the educational process--that is less understood. But just how valid is this argument?

    But these conditions can't be met without a broader and deeper commitment to public education beyond preparing workers. An interesting volume. Our kids need the best. This book is important reading for those who wish to promote significant use of new technologies because it dispels the notion that penetration the installation of many computers automatically translates into a transformation of classroom activities - what is usually called curriculum integration. Cuban separates computer use in education into three categories: computer-assisted instruction, computer-managed instruction, and computer-enhanced instruction. The Setting 2.


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Oversold and underused book

Our kids can't be left behind. Please call before going to store. Well before the publication of The World Is Flat, and across political lines, there has been a concern that we are "a nation at risk," and that we need to make sure our children are computer "savvy. Can we really expect, if there are relatively few computers available to students, if they are available only for limited periods of time, and if they are often Oversold and underused book, that it would really make sense for a teachers to change the way they teach because of computers?

Most of those involved in our educational system need to get paid for their work, but are actually involved in the work because of a personal commitment to the cause of education.

In addition, early adopters of gamification techniques in the classroom tended to be computer science instructors, implying that a degree of familiarity with the gaming environment is needed before seeing significant trends in the use of gamification in instruction.

More attention, Cuban says, needs to be paid to the civic and social goals of schooling, goals that make the question of how many computers are in classrooms trivial. And I can't stop thinking about the concept of a "web appliance:" a no-maintenance computer that provides access to the web.

If every classroom in a school had some number of "webstations" that the teachers knew were always available and would always work, would they begin to integrate web reasearch and other web tools into their classwork as easily as they have the overhead projector?

But perhaps I can say that we're starting to? The importance rests in user-centered movements that tap into creativity and diversity, and don't reduce users either students or teachers to consumers. And while there was a natural tendency in the interview to focus on the "oversold" part of Dr.

But just how much of this is true? I did ask Dr. This is something I would like specific feedback on, and would like to try some testing if anyone is interested. Our kids need the best. In his final chapter, Cuban asks, "Are computers in school worth the investment?

Cuban examines first-hand, rather than relying on self-reporting, how nursery and high school teachers in Silicon Valley actually use computers One hopes Cuban's arguments will cause some educational leaders to reconsider their priorities.

As we know, none of them did. Arguing that the educational revolution that computers were expected to incite has progressed far too slowly, he recommends that administrators involve teachers in the planning and implementation of technology plans and allow them more unstructured time, technical support, and professional development opportunities to optimize the educational benefits that computers offer.

Making Sense of Unexpected Outcomes 6. Synthesizing all the research now available, and drawing on his own studies of early childhood, high school, and university classrooms in Silicon Valley, Larry Cuban found that students and teachers use the new technologies far less in the classroom than they do at home and that most classroom use is unimaginative.

In a free-market economy, it is hard to see an alternative, but Dr. Indeed, Cuban directs at politicians and other policy makers many of his pleas to re-evaluate the uses of computers in schools. State department officials involved in educational decision-making would benefit from reading Cuban's proposal to limit spending on technology and instead focus on such goals as reducing class sizes, renovating buildings, and offering full-day preschool and kindergarten and innovative arts programs in the primary grades.

More attention, Cuban says, needs to be paid to the civic and social goals of schooling, goals that make the question of how many computers are in classrooms trivial.

If the cost of having one-to-one computing can be significantly reduced, there should be a great opportunity to study the transformative effects of this kind of program.

Even in the heartland of the new technology, classrooms run much as they did a generation ago: they just have new expensive toys in the corner. What makes Cuban's findings especially noteworthy is the fact that the two high schools and the university being studied have taken special efforts to support the use of new technologies.

But these conditions can't be met without a broader and deeper commitment to public education beyond preparing workers.

Cuban reports that teachers tend to transform the new technologies to conform with existing traditions of classroom practice. Appendix: rationale for choices of school levels Edition Notes Includes bibliographical references p.

Cuban's book is a must-read for politicians, parents, school administrators, teachers, technophiles and technophobes."Oversold and Underused" uses the author's apparently great array of resources to compile a comprehensive study on one of the newest, most popular educational fads: computers.

They're everywhere. In computer labs, in classrooms, and in libraries (now, because of this, called "media centers" in many places), among others/5(11). Dec 08,  · To the Internet Archive Community, Time is running out: please help the Internet Archive today.

The average donation is $ If everyone chips in $5, we can keep our website independent, strong and ad-free. Right now, a generous supporter will match your donation 2 Pages: May 06,  · Buy Oversold and Underused: Computers in the Classroom New Ed by Larry Cuban (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Oversold and Underused : Computers in the Classroom

Everyday low prices and free delivery on /5(17). May 06,  · Publishers Weekly Oversold and Underused will benefit educational researchers and policy makers and anyone with an interest in computers. Indeed, Cuban directs at politicians and other policy makers many of his pleas to re-evaluate the uses of computers in schools/5(70).

BOOK REVIEWS Oversold and Underused: Computers in the Classroom, by Larry Cuban, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, Reviewed by: Heidi Schweizer, Carrianne Hayslett, and Robert Lowe, Marquette University REBOOTING THE PROMISE OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Reform has become as much a hallmark of American education as tests and.

Sep 03,  · Oversold & Underused: Computers in the Classroom. [email protected] Larry Cuban. Oversold & Underused: Computers in the Classroom (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, ).

Oversold and Underused

$ ISBN X p. In his newest book, Larry Cuban investigates how new technologies are used in schools. Cuban, an emeritus professor of.